Misprints Newsletter is Back

For the last few weeks I’ve seen an uptick in the number of small presses coming out with indie litmags. Most of these are simply a WordPress site and a twitter account with an email to send subs to. I think it’s great. In fact, I’ve submitted to a few this past month.

Keeping a schedule to write during this event is next to impossible so I’ve been writing on weekends and doing job work during the week. The time it takes to cook 2-3 full meals for five people every day then clean it up eats up any constructive writing time. Uber eats and treating weekends as weekends are fixing this.

Last time I was seriously writing I was also putting out a weekly newsletter. The last one went out in December of 2018 just before I published my book. I figure now is as good of a time as any to start it back up and enforce that personal deadline.

The newsletter itself doesn’t take long to put together, maybe an hour at the most and can be written the night before or so. Back in 2018 I had no real content for it as I had planned to use it to cover 3d printing and other art type stuff but it transformed into news about writing instead. I then named my imprint after it when I had to come up with one when setting up my ISBN’s.

So the thing is back and this time I have little things to put in it. I have weeks if not months of little bits of flash fiction and writing exercises I can throw in each week. They aren’t good enough to submit or put in a chapbook or anything but won’t ruin an email newsletter.

I’ve subscribed to several folks’ newsletters over the years. There are whole blog posts on medium and other sites about how to structure one and everyone does it differently. Only one or two ever went over 5k words. Some are clearly written from a marketing standpoint. You’ll recognize those by being too saccharine straight out of the gate. They also like to put keywords in bold, and spend way too long explaining how they are going to tell you something rather than just doing it.

Some, and I’ve done this before, put affiliate links to things in them. I won’t be doing that again. Any links you see will be genuine, straight to interesting news articles, or I’ll let you know it’s a friends website from the start. So much on the internet is an attempt to sell you something that it makes it hard to trust what you’re about to read.

I’ve even taken all the ads off this website as well. Last month I tried to read one of my posts from my phone. (Not something I normally do.) The google ads were so invasive I couldn’t read the content. Remember back in the olden days when you could write something personal and the readers wouldn’t assume you were trying to sell them something?

The most important thing is that it keeps me on track and keeps me writing regularly so that what I do create is better than the previous project before it.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.